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UV WORKS... and works well.


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So I decided to finally tackle some nuisance algae in my system.  So I started dosing virbant and also did a mega dose of fluconozole to get rid of bryopsis.  As per the fluconazole directions, I took my carbon offline, turned of the ozone, and turned of my 110watt UV unit.  Somewhat predictably, 5 days later I had cyano bacteria in my frag tank.  Interesting not a lick in the display, but only in the frag tank but I have a lot of big dudes in the display so I guess it is not that surprising. 

Anywho..  I took my gyre and blew the cyano off my frag collection.  Of course, it was all back the next day.  Turned on the UV and the ozone and blew it off again.  It came back, but only about 20% of the original amount.  Blew it off again and now there is hardly anything around.  

I realize there are a couple different ways to tackle cyano.. mostly adding bacteria but I have to say that I am super happy that Jeff convinced me to put a honking UV light in my system.  Kind of pleasant to think about the cyano entering the UV alive and then coming out dead as a door nail. :) 

 

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They definitely make a difference. 

I have a large one on my tank and I was dealing with endless dinos that just wouldn't go away. I finally just turned the UV off about three weeks ago and the dinos are gone (knock on wood). I'm guessing other things are growing more now and sucking up the nutrients, but I have a huge clean up crew so hopefully it'll be a nice balance.

So that proved to me UV's are good at what they do - but I was dealing with Amphidinium dinos and the UV apparently doesn't really work as well with them.

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55 minutes ago, pdxmonkeyboy said:

So I decided to finally tackle some nuisance algae in my system.  So I started dosing virbant and also did a mega dose of fluconozole to get rid of bryopsis.  As per the fluconazole directions, I took my carbon offline, turned of the ozone, and turned of my 110watt UV unit.  Somewhat predictably, 5 days later I had cyano bacteria in my frag tank.  Interesting not a lick in the display, but only in the frag tank but I have a lot of big dudes in the display so I guess it is not that surprising. 

Anywho..  I took my gyre and blew the cyano off my frag collection.  Of course, it was all back the next day.  Turned on the UV and the ozone and blew it off again.  It came back, but only about 20% of the original amount.  Blew it off again and now there is hardly anything around.  

I realize there are a couple different ways to tackle cyano.. mostly adding bacteria but I have to say that I am super happy that Jeff convinced me to put a honking UV light in my system.  Kind of pleasant to think about the cyano entering the UV alive and then coming out dead as a door nail. :) 

 

UV just minimizes any free floating bacteria or life. Normally a tiny smidge of cyano in your tank anywhere will eventually turn into cyano everywhere thanks to spores and flaking off bacteria. UV makes it so that almost all your water is sanitized consistently, so the only major spread is physical direct contact/neighboring bacterial spread. Together with clean up crew, microbial spread can be significantly hindered, though not necessarily stopped unless the underlying cause is addressed.

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Let's just stay I put UV in my new Reefer 525 build for the first time in a system. Didn't realized how well it worked until I accidentally left it off for a few weeks. I had to clean the glass twice as often in that period! Maybe it was related to something else... someone can correct me if I'm wrong.

Yes its only 10 months young... so a little early -knock on wood -no cyano, hair algae, bubble algae, bryposis, etc...... so far so good.

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On 11/12/2021 at 10:50 AM, SantaMonica said:

UV certainly does kill life in the water column. This adds nutrients to the water, which sometimes shows up as extra (attached) nuisance algae growth.

 I think a single pellet of dry food has more nutrients then all the dead bacteria combined.  Do you have literature that talks about nutrient amounts of bacteria, protozoans, etc.  I mean.. they are microscopic! 

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Yeah, I'm skeptical that it makes any difference in nutrients. These things are tiny, the total biomass of water microbes is not very large. 

 

Completely changes the microbial community and completely eliminates the most abundant group of Bacteria. But I doubt it affects the nutrients much. 

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On 11/12/2021 at 10:50 AM, SantaMonica said:

UV certainly does kill life in the water column. This adds nutrients to the water, which sometimes shows up as extra (attached) nuisance algae growth.

False statement just trying to push your product.

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The biomass of bacteria is more that the amount of all other life combined. It's the largest biomass on the earth. Best way to learn is to get a marine biology book for college students; I used to have the title of the one I like but can't find it now. Most books are good however.

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10 hours ago, SantaMonica said:

The biomass of bacteria is more that the amount of all other life combined. It's the largest biomass on the earth. Best way to learn is to get a marine biology book for college students; I used to have the title of the one I like but can't find it now. Most books are good however.

Ummmm. Not true at all, not even close to being true.  Another way to learn these things is get a masters degree in biology.  While single cell organisms and bacteria rule the ocean... terrestrial biomass crushes that by a long shot. 

I think you might want to re-read that book or look at the data again. People often look at data and draw the wrong conclusion.  

Example: playing basketball makes you tall....

360px-Biomass_by_life_form.jpg

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10 hours ago, SantaMonica said:

The biomass of bacteria is more that the amount of all other life combined. It's the largest biomass on the earth. Best way to learn is to get a marine biology book for college students; I used to have the title of the one I like but can't find it now. Most books are good however.

Wait... are you mike lindell? 

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