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180Bob

Tanks for Teachers??

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On our way to MCMAC we stopped by Advanced Aquarium in Salem and we had a good discussion with Mr. S on how our club might help teachers with marine education. One of the ideas that we tossed around was that our club might provide "Bullet Proof" aquarium setups to some teachers. Then at MCMAC I saw the DIY Nano tank that they auctioned off. As far as I understand their club built this tank as a club projects. I was wondering why we couldn't get together and do something like this. We could take the money from the auction and buy a tank for some deserving teacher. Another option would be that who ever wants a tank in their children's class room could chip in for the cost of parts, then the club could get together and build several tanks. I wouldn't be surprised if we could get things like acrylic, pumps, lights etc at wholesale cost.

 

What do people think? In particular, teachers in the crowd, what kind of tank would you like to see built?

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I like this idea...We could also make some brochures that talks about the club and how the tank was donated, to send home with all the kids...This may drive alot more traffic to to the site...

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So, we (bluecheese, 180bob and 180brandy) were in chat discussing ways to go about this and I have volunteered my small 12gal to possibly get this going...

 

Here is the tank...

 

http://www.petco.com/product/13810/Marineland-Eclipse-System-12-Aquarium-Kit.aspx

 

It has a filter pad system with a bio-wheel. I upgraded the lights so there are 2 flourancent 15w bulbs in there....I kept LPS in here no problem with a couple of fish...

 

What is needed for it, to get it going:

- A constant supply of pads that need to be changed every 4 weeks (petco sells them for 11.00 for three of them)

- LR

- Sand

- Heater

- Live stock

 

We would like to hear everyones comments on this, suggestions, etc.

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Well we discussed the idea some more tonight and it would be great to get some teachers or tutors, parents involved and their opinion.

Any teachers around, Joel, Dennis? Anyone else? Who else has kids and would get involved with their teacher from their class?(yahoo)

We would probably need initially people to participate in

1- Donating/building equipment- Tanks etc..

2- Donating live stock

3- Tutoring- Help with set-up etc..

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So, we (bluecheese, 180bob and 180brandy) were in chat discussing ways to go about this and I have volunteered my small 12gal to possibly get this going...

 

Here is the tank...

 

http://www.petco.com/product/13810/Marineland-Eclipse-System-12-Aquarium-Kit.aspx

 

It has a filter pad system with a bio-wheel. I upgraded the lights so there are 2 flourancent 15w bulbs in there....I kept LPS in here no problem with a couple of fish...

 

What is needed for it, to get it going:

- A constant supply of pads that need to be changed every 4 weeks (petco sells them for 11.00 for three of them)

- LR

- Sand

- Heater

- Live stock

 

We would like to hear everyones comments on this, suggestions, etc.

 

That's a great start RG, I can probably come up with some sand.

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Well, since you asked...

 

The tank would need to be "bulletproof" unless the teacher has some experience with reefing. There is an article on making "bulletproof" reefs on http://www.garf.org/trever/SHOWTR/index.html I am not advocating for a plennum, or a DSB, but the whole tank need to be mostly self maintaining.

 

When I was thinking of setting up a tank in my classroom to have a variety of inverts, the limiting factor always came to lights. Spending $3-500 on just the lights needed for most of these animals is just out of the reach of most teachers. Both for the school budget, as well as out of their personal budget. Because on top of the lights, there are powerheads, salt, ROCK (DIY to make cheaper?), and then the animals themselves... Setting up a tank seems to need about $1000, no matter how you do it. I was looking at the all in one tanks like the AquaPod or Biocube. Nice products, and simple for the beginner.

 

I even looked at Albany Aquarium, and Rodger was showing me the Catalina copy of the Aquapod. I almost went that way. If he were to get a couple of those, and sell them at cost to teachers, they would be a good start. It has the lights, filters, everything needed to start the tank. Add some DIY rock, and that would be a great start for a classroom tank. Most importantly, it is enclosed so the little hands are not always poking inside, and random things don't get dumped in the tank.

 

I think the most important piece of equipment would be a club member that is willing to offer help when there are questions. I helped my co-teacher set up a marine tank last year. I tried to help guide her to getting the right stuff from the beginning. However she had already ordered a "complete setup" from a science supply company. BIG MISTAKE. It would have been great for a guppy tank, but not for a marine tank. Under-gravel filter, crushed coral, airstone lifts, the whole works.

 

There were many animals that I identified for her, and the animals that they sent her were all out of proportion. In a 20g, there were 4 brittle stars, about 20 hermits, about 15 snails (no algae to eat), two decorator crabs, an Atlantic anemone (not enough light so it died). We will see about how it has lasted over the summer.

 

I could add more, but I need to get to work. (I am fixing my chimney today)

 

dsoz

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Well, since you asked...

 

The tank would need to be "bulletproof" unless the teacher has some experience with reefing. There is an article on making "bulletproof" reefs on http://www.garf.org/trever/SHOWTR/index.html I am not advocating for a plennum, or a DSB, but the whole tank need to be mostly self maintaining.

 

When I was thinking of setting up a tank in my classroom to have a variety of inverts, the limiting factor always came to lights. Spending $3-500 on just the lights needed for most of these animals is just out of the reach of most teachers. Both for the school budget, as well as out of their personal budget. Because on top of the lights, there are powerheads, salt, ROCK (DIY to make cheaper?), and then the animals themselves... Setting up a tank seems to need about $1000, no matter how you do it. I was looking at the all in one tanks like the AquaPod or Biocube. Nice products, and simple for the beginner.

 

I even looked at Albany Aquarium, and Rodger was showing me the Catalina copy of the Aquapod. I almost went that way. If he were to get a couple of those, and sell them at cost to teachers, they would be a good start. It has the lights, filters, everything needed to start the tank. Add some DIY rock, and that would be a great start for a classroom tank. Most importantly, it is enclosed so the little hands are not always poking inside, and random things don't get dumped in the tank.

 

I think the most important piece of equipment would be a club member that is willing to offer help when there are questions. I helped my co-teacher set up a marine tank last year. I tried to help guide her to getting the right stuff from the beginning. However she had already ordered a "complete setup" from a science supply company. BIG MISTAKE. It would have been great for a guppy tank, but not for a marine tank. Under-gravel filter, crushed coral, airstone lifts, the whole works.

 

There were many animals that I identified for her, and the animals that they sent her were all out of proportion. In a 20g, there were 4 brittle stars, about 20 hermits, about 15 snails (no algae to eat), two decorator crabs, an Atlantic anemone (not enough light so it died). We will see about how it has lasted over the summer.

 

I could add more, but I need to get to work. (I am fixing my chimney today)

 

dsoz

 

That is great input...That is the cool thing about the tank I offered up...it is free and it would be great to test the waters... It has lights, filter and water movement. Like I said, I kept LPS in it with no trouble...no I am sure that softies would not be a porblem...It can not fit a skimmer, so that could be an issue, but with regular water changes it would be fine...

 

But if there is a great deal on a slightly bigger tank, like the catalina ones, then that might be a good route to go, if the club could afford it...

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i love this if there is anything i can do let me know. don't have much extra stuff layin around but would be more than happy to help mentor a teacher or even go do water changes for them.

 

unless its for Dsoz..... ;)

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i love this if there is anything i can do let me know. don't have much extra stuff layin around but would be more than happy to help mentor a teacher or even go do water changes for them.

 

unless its for Dsoz..... ;)

 

What? Don't you want to change my water? How about emptying my skimmer for me? It smells NASTY!

 

dsoz :)

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We could take the money from the auction and buy a tank for some deserving teacher. Another option would be that who ever wants a tank in their children's class room could chip in for the cost of parts, then the club could get together and build several tanks. I wouldn't be surprised if we could get things like acrylic, pumps, lights etc at wholesale cost.

 

What do people think? In particular, teachers in the crowd, what kind of tank would you like to see built?

Don't worry about getting acrylic at wholesale, gotcha covered on that. Lemme know how this project progresses.

 

James

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I would be willing to help do some maintanence on local tanks if this thing pulls through. I think getting children interested in the reef my be one of the best ways to save it. I also may have some frags to donate to a couple of tanks after not to long.

 

Garrett

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Well, since you asked...

 

The tank would need to be "bulletproof" unless the teacher has some experience with reefing. There is an article on making "bulletproof" reefs on http://www.garf.org/trever/SHOWTR/index.html I am not advocating for a plennum, or a DSB, but the whole tank need to be mostly self maintaining.

 

When I was thinking of setting up a tank in my classroom to have a variety of inverts, the limiting factor always came to lights. Spending $3-500 on just the lights needed for most of these animals is just out of the reach of most teachers. Both for the school budget, as well as out of their personal budget. Because on top of the lights, there are powerheads, salt, ROCK (DIY to make cheaper?), and then the animals themselves... Setting up a tank seems to need about $1000, no matter how you do it. I was looking at the all in one tanks like the AquaPod or Biocube. Nice products, and simple for the beginner.

 

I even looked at Albany Aquarium, and Rodger was showing me the Catalina copy of the Aquapod. I almost went that way. If he were to get a couple of those, and sell them at cost to teachers, they would be a good start. It has the lights, filters, everything needed to start the tank. Add some DIY rock, and that would be a great start for a classroom tank. Most importantly, it is enclosed so the little hands are not always poking inside, and random things don't get dumped in the tank.

 

I think the most important piece of equipment would be a club member that is willing to offer help when there are questions. I helped my co-teacher set up a marine tank last year. I tried to help guide her to getting the right stuff from the beginning. However she had already ordered a "complete setup" from a science supply company. BIG MISTAKE. It would have been great for a guppy tank, but not for a marine tank. Under-gravel filter, crushed coral, airstone lifts, the whole works.

 

There were many animals that I identified for her, and the animals that they sent her were all out of proportion. In a 20g, there were 4 brittle stars, about 20 hermits, about 15 snails (no algae to eat), two decorator crabs, an Atlantic anemone (not enough light so it died). We will see about how it has lasted over the summer.

 

I could add more, but I need to get to work. (I am fixing my chimney today)

 

dsoz

 

Thanks for the input. I have a couple of questions:

 

1) What size tank would you think be the best beginning size for teachers: 10-20, 20-30, 30-50 gallons.

2) Wouldn't VHO or PC lighting be enough for a beginning tank. This should cost significantly less than $500.

3) Would it be better to have a sand for the tank too, or could it sit on a counter? Do you know the standard depth of school counter tops.

4) Are you using a chiller on you tanks? This would be a big part of the cost if needed.

5) Do you have a RO/DI unit at the school? I guess a member could supply this to the teacher.

 

Bob

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Thanks for the input. I have a couple of questions:

 

1) What size tank would you think be the best beginning size for teachers: 10-20, 20-30, 30-50 gallons.

2) Wouldn't VHO or PC lighting be enough for a beginning tank. This should cost significantly less than $500.

3) Would it be better to have a sand for the tank too, or could it sit on a counter? Do you know the standard depth of school counter tops.

4) Are you using a chiller on you tanks? This would be a big part of the cost if needed.

5) Do you have a RO/DI unit at the school? I guess a member could supply this to the teacher.

 

Bob

 

To be honest, each teacher would need to answer these questions for themselves. And elementary school will have different needs than middle or high school. In middle/high it depends on if it is a science room or not. For example, in my high school science room I have a lot of counter (lab) space. I have tap water (not RO/DI), and I have a lot of electrical outlets. My room is climate controlled (72F year round) while most older schools are not.

 

I think a 20g would be ideal for a small starter tank. A stand would probably be good for most teacher. And PC lights should be good enough for zoas, mushrooms, leathers, and maybe even some LPS. A 20g would also give enough room for some snails, a few hermits, and 2-3 fish. Each class could have their nemo, and maybe a goby, and something else.

 

This is looking better. Now someone just needs to start pounding pavement when the school year starts and ask some teachers if they want a PNWMAS sponsored tank in their classroom. I would be a willing "lab rat" to test this on... :) But I know what I am doing (I keep telling myself), so it would not be a fair test of the program.

 

dsoz

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To be honest, each teacher would need to answer these questions for themselves. And elementary school will have different needs than middle or high school. In middle/high it depends on if it is a science room or not. For example, in my high school science room I have a lot of counter (lab) space. I have tap water (not RO/DI), and I have a lot of electrical outlets. My room is climate controlled (72F year round) while most older schools are not.

 

I think a 20g would be ideal for a small starter tank. A stand would probably be good for most teacher. And PC lights should be good enough for zoas, mushrooms, leathers, and maybe even some LPS. A 20g would also give enough room for some snails, a few hermits, and 2-3 fish. Each class could have their nemo, and maybe a goby, and something else.

 

This is looking better. Now someone just needs to start pounding pavement when the school year starts and ask some teachers if they want a PNWMAS sponsored tank in their classroom. I would be a willing "lab rat" to test this on... :) But I know what I am doing (I keep telling myself), so it would not be a fair test of the program.

 

dsoz

 

I'll be the first to signup and ask my daughters teachers.

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We have some used 20 gallon tall and 20 gallon long glass tanks we can donate.

 

Some 20s would be great! I will give you a call tomorrow about picking some up!

 

John Manrow

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To be honest, each teacher would need to answer these questions for themselves. And elementary school will have different needs than middle or high school. In middle/high it depends on if it is a science room or not. For example, in my high school science room I have a lot of counter (lab) space. I have tap water (not RO/DI), and I have a lot of electrical outlets. My room is climate controlled (72F year round) while most older schools are not.

 

I think a 20g would be ideal for a small starter tank. A stand would probably be good for most teacher. And PC lights should be good enough for zoas, mushrooms, leathers, and maybe even some LPS. A 20g would also give enough room for some snails, a few hermits, and 2-3 fish. Each class could have their nemo, and maybe a goby, and something else.

 

This is looking better. Now someone just needs to start pounding pavement when the school year starts and ask some teachers if they want a PNWMAS sponsored tank in their classroom. I would be a willing "lab rat" to test this on... :) But I know what I am doing (I keep telling myself), so it would not be a fair test of the program.

 

dsoz

 

One other question. Are your tanks glass or acrylic? I wonder if acrylic tank would be scratched beyond recognition in a few months. I guess at least with acrylic you don't have to worry about the glass shattering and dumping the whole tank on the floor.

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Bob is so confused Dosz!!! He thought you had a tank at school. (wife)

 

I didn't get one set up because I found out that I am probably not teaching biology next year. I was going to use it as a learning tool for my biology class (nitrogen cycle, ecosystems, symbiosis, life cycle, asexual reproduction, etc.). Since I will be teaching chemistry and physics next year, a tank does not fit as well into the lesson plans. I guess I can make it fit. Water chemistry, specific gravity, flow rate...

 

I just like to keep my hands wet. And a classroom tank always draws in kids that don't seem to connect in other ways.

 

I think you would be a great "lab rat"!!! I mean that in the nicest way.:D
Thank you very much. I kinda think rats are "cute" :)

 

dsoz

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