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Are there any creatures in the oregon coast that tolerate warm water?


LadAShark

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As the title asks: are there any critters that are tolerant of warm water in the oregon coast? Particularly invertebrates that could be quarantined and acclimated to a tank. Though I doubt there are, it would be cool if some of them could actually be acclimated.

Edited by LadAShark
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I have a buddy of mine that has been temp acclimating anemones from our coast to warmer water. He has been doing this for a bit over a month with 5 specimens and hasn't lost any. Last I heard he was in the low 70's temp wise and still climbing.

Edited by Fragged
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I have had luck in the past with nems, hermits, and snails from tide pools. I started them at roughly 50 degrees. Increased the water temp by 2-3 degrees per week until I reached 78 degrees. Kept all specimens I collected for 4 months after reaching 78 degrees with no losses. After the 4 month mark I slowly lowered water temperature down to 50 degrees and then returned them back to tide pools after drip acclimation to ocean temperature. Was a fun experiment. I am not sure how they would do long term. Possible abnormal growth, shortened life span etc. I would be interested to see a long term study on this subject.

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I have always wanted to do a cold water tank for tide pool type items collected at the coast. Pretty cool that some have been able to acclimate them to warmer temps, but I would rather have a chiller and know that they are at their normal temp and hopefully be able to create a cool little tide pool. A shallow tank like Powder Blue's would be perfect.

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I have had luck in the past with nems, hermits, and snails from tide pools. I started them at roughly 50 degrees. Increased the water temp by 2-3 degrees per week until I reached 78 degrees. Kept all specimens I collected for 4 months after reaching 78 degrees with no losses. After the 4 month mark I slowly lowered water temperature down to 50 degrees and then returned them back to tide pools after drip acclimation to ocean temperature. Was a fun experiment. I am not sure how they would do long term. Possible abnormal growth, shortened life span etc. I would be interested to see a long term study on this subject.

That sounds awesome!

If we could get these guys to do well, then we could perhaps just pass on having to buy other critters from elsewhere, using money and risking the death of a bunch of animals in the process.

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I have always wanted to do a cold water tank for tide pool type items collected at the coast. Pretty cool that some have been able to acclimate them to warmer temps, but I would rather have a chiller and know that they are at their normal temp and hopefully be able to create a cool little tide pool. A shallow tank like Powder Blue's would be perfect.

Some ocean critters have adaptations that allow them to live in multiple water temperatures. Usually if an animal can tolerate a different temperature and not die faster, then it really isn't unnatural for it to survive in such conditions.

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Albacore Tuna off the oregon coast from late June until October most years.

Any I'm supposed to keep one in a reasonably (like under 5,000 gallon!) aquarium how?

 

Pssh....I collect myself. [emoji6]

 

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

Same here ;P

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I have a buddy of mine that has been temp acclimating anemones from our coast to warmer water. He has been doing this for a bit over a month with 5 specimens and hasn't lost any. Last I heard he was in the low 70's temp wise and still climbing.

Yeah we have quite the nice anemones here haha.
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This idea of collecting temperate animals for acclimation into tropical will fail 100%. Oregon's native marine animals are true temperate sea creatures unlike southern California subtropical animals which can tolerate higher 60's for a short time, now it's true that inner tidal animals such as purple shore crabs and some anemones can regulate there body temperatures to combat low tide exposure twice a day but this is still temporary and in all of our experiments (Coldwatermarineaquatics) raising the temperature past mid 60's always resulted in stress on the animals and death. This notion you have is not new by any means and is still very frequently used in the tropical hobby as a money making scam by selling subtropical animals that can last for several months in a reef tank but will always end up starving to death from stress due temperature, temperate water has a higher oxygen content due to the lower temperature. This plan of yours sounds good in retrospect but will fail miserably not trying to highjack your thread and be the barrier of bad news but saving you the wasted time and flaming you will receive for trying somthing that's so obvious meaning that if this worked don't you think our company and the thousands of other companies would already be selling coldwater invertebrates and fish for tropical reefs lol???? If you need more info I would urge you to educate yourself by using online tools like fishbase.org or just Google for info on the temperature range of these animals and remember your not new at this by any means and a ton of people have already made these mistakes so you don't have to, if you need help setting up a coldwater tank feel free to email me at coldwatermarineaquatics@gmail

Josh Groves

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Yup, what Josh said :) Short term exposure to elevated temperatures outside of their normal range they will be fine, long term will extremely shorten their lifespan. If these species could successfully be acclimated to higher temperatures over the long term they would already be living in those areas in the wild.

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I was already aware of how colder water was able to dissolve more oxygen. I was just wondering whether there were any exceptions in the Oregon coast. I didn't belive that there were, but I was curious to see whether any of you knew of any that could live long term. Oh well then.

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It's one of many reasons I made the jump towards temperate marine hobby just due to the fact I could collect my own animals legally!

It's unfortunate that the critters that I like most, catsharks and carpet sharks, are generally either tropical or cold water, and finding any temperate ones would be costly. Otherwise I'd totally go temperate/coldwater. And there aren't many temperate fish that interest me, sooo I'm stuck with tropical tanks.

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