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Freshwater fish Post


joshdahlquist
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I DO! I love freshwater! I know aclockworkorange and Badxgillen have fresh tanks too! Right now I am low on the freshwater side but things are always changing. I have a system cycling now for fresh. I still have my large 9-10 inch datnoid and silver scat. Also have some synodontis, a few plecos (I said it), and an eel. I have had them all at least 7-8 years and to be honest would keep them over any other tank if I had to choose.

 

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I love my frehwater tank!

 

I could not bear to give it up I have had most of these fish for 7+ years now. They are in a 55 gallon right now but they may have my spare 75 in their future :)

 

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Sorry no discus ( they are very cool though ) but I have some angel fish, silver dollars, red tail shark, picus catfish, and a gold seveum.

 

Before the severum came in to the fold it was a stunning planted tank. Lets just say with my little fishy friend it now has durable plastic plants (whistle)

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I have two freshwater nano-tanks. One 7.5 gallon shrimp tank with a small school of mosquito rasboras...

 

 

And I also have a 2 gallon nano-tank at work with Yellow shrimp and Amano shrimp. I may add some of the tiger shrimp babies when they get big enough.

 

This is the same tank as my saltwater pico reef in its intended freshwater setup. It's an awesome tank for freshwater shrimp or betas.

 

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Here's a picture of both tanks together when I was setting up the 2 gallon at home.

 

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Thats what it looks like....How do you like it? How old are the tanks? How does it benefit the shrimp? I am assuming by the size lets babies escape? I am curious because I am looking for some planted substrates. I want a high quality, long lasting planted tank substrate with an extremely natural look

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I'm pretty sure the substrate will last for years. My big (7.5 gallon) tank is about a year old. As you can see, it's pretty heavily planted. I get pretty good plant growth given that I don't use CO2, fertilizer or anything else. I run it on an 8 hour photoperiod with a simple fluorescent light for aquarium plants. I'm been considering converting that tank to LEDs.

 

For some odd reason, most of my yellow shrimp seem to have disappeared, but the rest are doing fine, and the tiger shrimp that I've had a difficult time keeping alive are breeding now. My parameters are all spot on, so I'm not sure why the yellows went away. I'm going to pick up a copper test kit just in case. Perhaps there are trace amounts of copper in my home water supply that have been building up over time. I'm pretty sure all of the pipes are iron though.

 

I have a massive Cascade 750 canister filter on that tank which adds a couple gallons to the total water voluem, so the water stays really clean and the filter doesn't have to be messed with too often. And the filter feeders love the amount of flow it gives them.

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Ok, now if it wasn't bad enough that I had problem flatworms in my saltwater pico reef, I apparently have a problem with the type of planaria that attack and eat shrimp in my 7.5 gallon freshwater nano, and they've been busy.

 

That explains the diminishing number of yellow shrimp in conjunction with good water parameters.

 

As of this evening, I'm left with my bamboo shrimp, my vampire shrimp, two Amano and two pregnant female tiger shrimp. Not one yellow left. In a rescue effort, they're all going to my 2 gallon nano at work while I tear down the 7.5 gallon and rebuild it... hopefully with no shrimp eating planaria hitchhikers this time.

 

Actually, I was just reading that there is some sort of natural product that will control planaria that's new on the market and is shrimp safe. At least I should be able to get the 7.5 up and cycled again in a week or less since my filter is still fully stocked with bacteria.

 

The remaining shrimp should be comfortable at work for the time being.

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Speaking of freshwater tanks. After having to move all of my shrimp to the two gallon tank at work to save them from the evil shrimp eating planaria worms, I've decided not to rebuild my freshwater tank until I've moved in with my girlfriend in a couple months.

 

So, I know the 2 gallon tank cannot sustain two filter feeding shrimp (See video in previous post). If anyone has a mature tank that is at least 7 gallons or larger and has fish that wouldn't tend to want to eat a shrimp (like Rasboras or White Clouds or other very small non-agressive fish--or ideally a planted shrimp tank). I feel like I need to give these two a new home. Sadly, they're my favorites, but I need to do what's best for them. They're completely benign and non-agressive... I mean, they have fans for hands after all.

 

Does anyone have a freshwater tank that would be suitable for these amazing shrimp?

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You know, the 3 gallon would be perfect for just about any dwarf freshwater shrimp EXCEPT the filter feeders. There's not going to be enough suspended particulate food for them in a tank that small. Hence why I need to re-home them.

 

That said, just about any other type of dwarf freshwater shrimp will do great in a 3 gallon planted tank. I'd be happy to help you set one up. I'd start with some hearty varieties... Amano shrimp are probably the heartiest, but the real fun is going to be with something like Cherry Red shrimp, Yellow shrimp or Tiger shrimp that will breed in your little tank.

 

All of them eat algae as their main diet, so if you have a decently lit, planted tank, you *almost* don't have to feed them. I kept an Amano shrimp in a two quart sealed biosphere for 8 months. He unfortunately passed away when I moved him to a new biosphere. I may not have acclimated him long enough.

 

Anyhow, it's a pretty cool experiment. Here's a short video of the biosphere.

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