Jump to content

Gettin' nervous about my new Clam...


jadams7

Recommended Posts

Alright, last sunday I was in Eugene and decided to grab one of the ORA tank raised clams they had at Aqua Serene. The little guy I got is a 1" derasa, and was acclimated for about an hour into my established 24 gal aquapod (with sunpod 150w halide) which currently houses my other clam temporarily (3-4" maxima clam, doing great). It opened up fine, was sitting on the sand bed for a day, then decided to close up almost all the way over night/the next morning.

The only fish I have in the tank is a small 6-line wrasse, I also have the usual assortment of cleanup crews, a coral banded shrimp, fire shrimp, and peppermint shrimp.

I let him sit for another day, he did not open up, and in fear of him coming in with a disease of some sort, or him not enjoying the nano, I decided to move him to my recently setup 2x2x2 tank. Prior to putting him into the new tank, I gave him an iodine dip for 10 min, then acclimated him into the 2x2x2. So there he has sat, all day today, barely open (maybe 1/4 inch). Open just enough to see him still in there, and he will still close up all the way if I reach in and attempt to get my hand close to him. He is sitting in the sand bed, I have a 250w 14k halide on the tank, and he is on the bottom not directly in the light, but still getting plenty.

I tested the water in the 2x2x2 just to be sure...

Phosphate 0ppm

Nitrate 0ppm

Nitrite 0ppm

Ph 8.0

Ammonia .25 ppm

Calcium 520

 

 

(scratch)My questions are...what should I do from here? Leave him be, and if so for how long? Move him into stronger lighting? Less lighting? I read they prefer a sand bed, but should I move him to a rock? Try feeding him or something? Move him back into the 24g nano? Did I forget something?

 

Just a bit nervous here(scary), I may be overreacting I guess, seeing as it has only been a couple of days, but I just dont want to lose the little guy. I have never had a problem with my maxima clam, so this caught me a bit off guard. Better safe than sorry I guess, so if anyone has any suggestions that would be awesome!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try feeding it. I know that you have to hand feed clams that are under four inches. Once they get bigger then Usually the lighting you have should be enough. Has your clam attached it's self in the sand? Also what is your mag levels? Also your calcium levels are on the high side. Your calcium levels should be between 400 and 450.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have clams, and I probably won't get one any time soon, but...

 

Did you check it for pyramid snails and pinched mantle disease?

 

There was a thread a little bit ago about clams that were having problems with pinched mantle. I think a freshwater dip clears it up. It is worth a shot if nothing else.

 

dsoz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey thanks for all the help guys(and gals)...but unfortunately it was too late. Woke up this morning to find a mucus ball inside of a shell. I guess this was just a lesson learned in buying small clams...

I did check for pyramids and mantle disease and it looked to be fine, my magnesium test kit is missing the little card (so i have not checked it yet) and I thought I got all of the air bubbles out. Was going to try to feed him this morning, had the cyclopeeze all ready to go, but it was too late. I figured I would give him a couple days before feeding, but I will try that a bit earlier next time (if there is a next time).

Again, thanks for the help guys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

calcium?

 

Try feeding it. I know that you have to hand feed clams that are under four inches. Once they get bigger then Usually the lighting you have should be enough. Has your clam attached it's self in the sand? Also what is your mag levels? Also your calcium levels are on the high side. Your calcium levels should be between 400 and 450.

 

Is the calcium to high for just clams? I thought you could go higher than that and be safe.

 

Sorry for the loss.

Beckie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some of the best advice I can give is one make sure your tank is established before getting a clam. By this I mean if your tank is new wait at least 8 months or more so your tank can settle down. Next make sure your calcium levels are between 400 and 450. 440 is a good target range. Then find out what the clams needs are certain clams like to be in the sand others like to be in the rocks.

I also believe that you had way to much ammonia in your tank. It should be 0. When clams are under 4 inches you have to hand feed them. Usually with a turkey baster.

 

So sorry for your loss. I do hope you get another clam in the future!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

siskiou- looked pretty healthy at the store. it was sitting in a little sand bed, so I figured it would be fine there.

As for the tank being established, I was using the same rock, sand, and water from a tank that has been established for some time. Also, he didnt seem to do well at all in the original 24g aquapod also, which had an ammonia of 0. From what I have heard from most people, it is just best to stay away from clams under 2". My other clam does great, and he is larger, in these same tanks. I am sure it definitely can be done, I just will not gamble another decent chunk of $$ away on such a small guy. I will just grab a larger one next time. Lesson learned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...