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pdxmonkeyboy

when is the club going to buy one of these...

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https://inspectusa.com/product_mobile.php?products_id=1537&utm_source=google-base&gclid=CjwKCAjw06LZBRBNEiwA2vgMVa0EB-K7kcZtEXQGk2kFzu28szy-mHuBkmFG3kHDdjud-TwRPZJ0ORoCSQ0QAvD_BwE

 

 

would love to know how much flow is in various parts of the aquarium. I would think it would be just as useful as a par meter.

 

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The have flow modules for the Apex. Maybe a few of us should go in on it and pass it around when needed.

 

 

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i dont know if that would work..as they are impellors mounted inside a pipe.

there is a cheaper way to go, vernier makes flow sensors that you can plug into a TI82 calculator and use that as a data logger.

need to research a bit. Dana riddle published some results on growth rates in different flow.

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@pdxmonkeyboy

This the one?  Very good presentation and I've never heard anything from Dana Riddle.  I like the way he explains things. 

 

 

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yeah that is the one. Even though he is a really slow talker, i liked that he had graphs and data.

i watched a macna video from the guy who writes the skeptical reef keeper series talk about phosphates. It was really disapointing. I will sum up his entire presentation "I have high phosphates and my tank is fine and i have no idea why"

anywho... Dana's talk was interesting. It is funny how it came out, people starting jacking their alk up to 12-14, then people where bleaching or browning out. Then people discover high numbers and low nutrients dont mix too well.

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Posted (edited)

Guess that answers your question in the PAR meter thread recently about whether or not SPS can actually have too much light.  As he says early in the presentation, we as reefkeepers are mostly responsible for maintaining parameters.  Since the combinations of a lot of these parameters aren't very well understood or explored, it's great to see some scientific backing on what is going to be best for optimal results.  Thanks for the suggestion!  I love waking up to this stuff.  

That giant porites picture was amazing and his explanation of how too much light is essentially stunting all tidepool corals makes a lot of sense.  The other huge thing I got was how chlorophyll and fluorescence are two separate and competing processes that go on in every coral.  Definitely explained some things regarding why we have a white peak in the middle of a big blue period.  

 

Edited by youcallmenny
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Yeah, I think people are starting to realize that hey... corals can take 600 PAR but they don't need or want that much.   I remember starting out not that long ago and shaking my head when seeing all of these different par charts for SPS.  It was a little frustrating.  Pretty much all my SPS stuff is at 250-350.  If they grow higher and get more light, then they should be able to take that much light, it will just will not likely grow as fast

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Very interesting that one graph showing effective photosynthesis over the course of a day compared to the PAR level and how only the tail ends of the day were actually dark enough to grow/fluoresce while most of the day it was shut down.  Effectively that stunts SPS corals growing in shallow water which does blow away some of the incorrect sentiment that 'Oh SPS grows right out of the water, it must not have limits!"

I hear ya on the lighting.  My whole year has been buckling down on this and I've been frankly shocked how much I had to turn my lights up, and then down.  Lot of misinformation so it's great to see these types of things.  In my case some kind intervention from club members and C&C employee's, Rudy/Bert's talk and borrowing the PAR meter again really facilitated it. 

As the video pointed out, there are 3 things that affect coral growth.  Light, flow and alkalinity.  Flow is extremely cost-restrictive to measure so we'd all better be sure to be able to test light and chemistry first if we're not achieving desired results.  

Edited by youcallmenny

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plants are the same way.. well, kind of. In plants there are limiting factors for growth that increase along with temperature. Light energy, co2 concentration, and water. That is why we blast our plants with light and spend about $1500/month on CO2. We boost co2 from 400 to about 1400-1500. The result is MUCH faster growth. It pretty much continues until there is too much light and u burn leaf tissue.

I suspect but actually have no evidence that this is the same situation. With higher disolved carbonates (alkalinity) in situations with enough light, and flow for refreshing of the boundary layer, you will see higher growth. People started latching on to this but when running ULNS ran into problems. Likely because there was not enough nutrients to sustain the reactions takiny place given the photosaturation and availability of carbonate.

Long story short... if corals were cheaper and the science farther along i would try to "overdrive" my corals. But for me, 300par average and 8 dkh is fine for me.

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Posted (edited)

I've never ran pressurized C02 like that but have been in gardens that do.  Just wasn't worth it when I was doing medical indoor due to cost and size of garden.  A 6k garden just didn't offset the logistics.  Now it's just annual outdoor and that requires a lot less work, let alone help with the wind.    It is indeed an impressive tool and a pretty good analogue to the alkalinity needs.  The boundary layer essentially exists with plants too in that without adequate ventilation (flow) they end up with C02-deficient layers in their canopies.  My wife and I have been growing since we got out of the service and I get a lot of enjoyment out of the similarities between the two hobbies, though I know one of them is a professional matter for you.  Really good observations here!

Just out of curiosity, what does your C02 get you?  2p per 1k instead of 1p?  

Edited by youcallmenny

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about 30% increase. Growing was fun when i had 10k. Try keeping 186k up and running (and cool).

 

Fear my power bill!!!

 

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Posted (edited)

Yea, exactly.  More power to you! (Pun kind of intended)  Haha dang, that's a pretty impressive number.  Dare I ask, have you calculated how much the power draw of just the lamps is costing you monthly?  

Edited by youcallmenny

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Our power bill last month was a tad over $18,300. How much draw is that?

 

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46 minutes ago, pdxmonkeyboy said:

Our power bill last month was a tad over $18,300. How much draw is that?

 

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Just under 20K worth?

and here I  complain about how much our tank adds to the electrical bill...

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11 hours ago, pdxmonkeyboy said:

Our power bill last month was a tad over $18,300. How much draw is that?

 

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An absolutely incredible amount.  

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