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mandy1eigh

Seahorse help

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In my office we had a worker who brought in a salt tank. Well he up and quit and I'm trying to take care of the tank. I know a little about salt water tanks because I have one at home. Well he had a seahorse and the seahorse just had babies. Omg....

 

I read quickly online and this is what I have done.

 

I removed them from the tank and brought them home. I took water from my sAlt tank and filled their tank half way. I have a light at the bottom of the tank. Some things for them to latch on. I have a small air stone and I got food from the reef store for them. I know nothing about sea horses.

 

Any advise please. 96a76c376f3366dfe58da68354b2d5b2.jpg

 

 

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Controlling the temperature of a seahorse tank is  important. Seahorses prefer cooler water than most tropical aquaria, so the tank should be kept cooler for their maximum comfort. A tank temperature of 74 to 76 degreesF will be good area..

 

HOB filter hang on the back is the best to use and in most cases that's what you should use.

 

 

very little water movement and don't put them in a established tank.

 

 

Make sure to house them in a species only tank

 

if you put crabs in there only do the blue hermits

 

 

Hope this gets ya started :)  Loved seahorses had some few years ago but they can be a ton of work

 

 

 

Just remember that seahorses are not going to be the same as a normal tank and if they get slapped around they can die.   Do up some research as well on them and of course come on back if you have more questions I had a small tank of them years ago and did well with them..

 

     ​

Edited by StayPuff

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To be completely honest as someone with 15 years experience with seahorses who has bred several species of seahorses the fry you have in that tank have 0 chance of survival and will die. The effort and cost that it would take at this point to raise the fry would be extremely prohibitive. Good news though, if you want to raise seahorse fry, you can likely expect more from that male in 14-20 days depending on the species. 

 

If you want help with preparing to raise another batch, I can share my experiences but the best place to look is on Seahorse.org. I am Kevin on that site ;)

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Controlling the temperature of a seahorse tank is  important. Seahorses prefer cooler water than most tropical aquaria, so the tank should be kept cooler for their maximum comfort. A tank temperature of 74 to 76 degreesF will be good area..

 

HOB filter hang on the back is the best to use and in most cases that's what you should use.

 

 

very little water movement and don't put them in a established tank.

 

 

Make sure to house them in a species only tank

 

if you put crabs in there only do the blue hermits

 

 

Hope this gets ya started :)  Loved seahorses had some few years ago but they can be a ton of work

 

 

 

Just remember that seahorses are not going to be the same as a normal tank and if they get slapped around they can die.   Do up some research as well on them and of course come on back if you have more questions I had a small tank of them years ago and did well with them..

 

     ​

IME a lot of that information is folklore spread by very well meaning hobbyists. 

 

The temperature recommendation to control bacterial infection is 74F or below. 75F is to high to control and mitigate the species of vibrio that affect seahorses. The temperature recommendation comes from research done by Dr. Belli based on growing out specimens of bacteria found in necropsied seahorses. The protein structure of the bacteria changes at a higher temperature to a more virulent strain that the seahorses lack a resistance to. It is hypothesized but not proven that seahorses are asymptomatic carriers for the bacteria and it "may" even help them with digestion, so it is not something you can quarantine out. 

 

That is the temperature recommendation for adult seahorses. To raise seahorse fry many breeders find an even lower temperature is best down to 65-68F as it lowers the seahorses metabolism allowing them to digest their food better. Seahorses have very inefficient digestive systems and fry need a ton of food so finding ways to get the most out of the food that you feed is a big priority when breeding seahorses IME. 

 

As to seahorses needing little water movement that is also false. If you have ever been diving and seen a seahorse you will often see them in very high flow areas, places where it can be hard for divers to even hang on to. I have ran seahorse tanks at 100x an hour and the seahorses lived and thrive (I was able to keep reidi to the age of 8 and an erectus to the age of 7). They do need the current to be broken up a bit more... so think vortech not maxijet. A narrow jet stream is hard for most fish to swim though. 

 

Species only tank? Ugh.., I guess you never read my article... :( http://www.seahorse.org/library/articles/tankmates/tankmates.shtml

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To be completely honest as someone with 15 years experience with seahorses who has bred several species of seahorses the fry you have in that tank have 0 chance of survival and will die. The effort and cost that it would take at this point to raise the fry would be extremely prohibitive. Good news though, if you want to raise seahorse fry, you can likely expect more from that male in 14-20 days depending on the species. 

 

If you want help with preparing to raise another batch, I can share my experiences but the best place to look is on Seahorse.org. I am Kevin on that site ;)

 

I didn't see the part about the babies missed that part :)

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