Jump to content

Proof about Phosphates


kriswaters
 Share

Recommended Posts

I just had an eye opening expierence. I want to thank Travis from Upscales a ton for helping me figure this out.

 

I have had a heck of a time with Algae. It has been mostly brown slime junk with a bit of hair algae. Now we all know that phosphates are the key to having or not having, and after testing my water coming out of the RO/DI and having zero, and after testing my WC water and having zero, I was at a loss.

 

Today I found the answer....pellet food. The test (done right before my eyes) proved it all! 10-12 pellets shot the phosphates way up! Imagine feeding that daily or every other day! No wonder my tank is slimed!

 

I have since tossed all of the "processed" food, pellets, flakes etc, and have switched to cyclopeeze. I will keep you updated on the process.

 

I also replaced my clowns that I lost back in december and bought a fox face and a duncan head! It was a merry (belated) christmas for me!

 

Kris

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice! if you can feed the duncan, it will make it grow really fast. I had two heads of duncan a few months ago. Once I started feeding them, each one started growing 4 baby heads from the base. Now I have 10 heads of duncan!!! I just gotta let them grow out so they can be chopped up :)

 

dsoz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So if I only feed enough pellets for my fish to suck up immediately, will this be a problem? My orange spot goby is a cow and comes right out and catches the pellets on their way down to the bottom. Do they release enough phosphate into the water that I may have an issue in the short time they're in there before being hoovered?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everything has phosphates in it as far as food, but certainly some have alot more than others. It comes from reactor media, food, water (non RODI) and dead stuff like snails or whatever might have died in your tank.

 

Keep in mind too, just because your tank doesnt show phosphates in a test kit, thats simply because the algae is consuming it. If you have an algae problem, you have a phosphate problem, there is pretty much no way around it. Algae must have phosphates (I think bubble algae would be the only exception, as it needs very little phos) to grow, so if you have algae growth, you have phosphates.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So if I only feed enough pellets for my fish to suck up immediately' date=' will this be a problem? My orange spot goby is a cow and comes right out and catches the pellets on their way down to the bottom. Do they release enough phosphate into the water that I may have an issue in the short time they're in there before being hoovered?[/quote']

 

Fish can't metabolize phosphates...the just shoot them out in waste! A portion of the phosphates still end up in the water column.

 

Kris

 

PS...I have a serious algae problem but hope to watch that go away. I just redirected my flow and the foxface is munching away!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More info

 

I am still working on this whole thing about phosphates. I was at Waves to day and Joel and I tested a few things as well.

 

He makes a valid argument that phosphates are present in nearly every type of protein food out there...the question is the concentration.

 

Now true that it may be, using a small container used to test the sample, houses a large amount of food, and this will in fact cause the phosphates to show up quickly and in large amounts. Yet does that same sample in 75 or 100 gallons produce the same amount of phosphates? Perphaps not as instantaneously, but over time...I believe what you feed will make an impact.

 

Both the cyclopeeze and the mysis shrimp tested had very little phosphates in the "control" test (the same small container) as the pellets and the flakes. Regardless of the "volume" tested...to me it shows a higher concentration of phosphates.

 

What does this all mean? Food can be problematic...no matter what. Some is worse then others, but I feel that I have seen proof enough that flake and pellets are not for me.

 

Joel also mentioned, as did Travis and mrgreenthumb (and countless others I am sure) that the sure fire way to control phosphates was through a reactor.

Joel also discussed the importance of filtration. Your RO/DI unit is only as good as its filters and of its overall output!

 

I will now start researching DIY reactors, as I can only control a percentage of my water quality, a reactor will help with that I can't control.

 

Kris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...