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Can my floor hold a 190 gallon tank?


Manny Tavan
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Always better to brace for the weight and not need it! Heck I braces my floors and i only have a 120g! Better to not have the "what if" in the back of your head... plus worst case it's only a couple hundred bucks for multi thousands you will have invested into your tank!

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I'd recommend, off doing a basement expansion on a 2 story home, no less than a 12" or larger 4" thick slab under each pier block. Ideally dig into the dirt and remove anything that you disturbed. Then place 1-2" of crushed rock, then compact, then 3-4" concrete. Flatten the concrete for a pier block. Or... Scuff off some dirt, lay a bit of 3/4- gravel, then pier block, then the adjustable post. Then adjust the support every 6 months for a couple years then yearly after that. That is probably what I'd do. BTW, thanks for the purchase. 

Edited by CrabbyCrabs
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I'm sure with the modern home you would be good with the pier block on 1" of 3/4- gravel packed with a mallet. I would use a cross support for the floor joists of no less than a 4x8 or 6x10 put it directly under the middle of the tank. Use two of the adjustable posts and give a slight preload to the floor before setting up the tank. After loading the tank give a little more preload on the supports. Use a level on floor joists and keep that level reading in mind while preloading. It's overkill but a 190 is probably over 2k LBS loaded. Think a small car in that space on your floor. Not necessarily a lot for a house on 16" centers but a lot of homes are built on 24" floor joist centers when built on pier blocks. Look at the size of the pier blocks the home is built on and you will understand.

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So with my years of construction I am with Crabby that overkill is always best practice but if your tank is going to be sitting on that beam as stated a little reinforcement for front of tank is a good idea. Do you really need it......probably not. I’m guessing you have 12 or 16” ibeams there so probably would never be an issue. But at the very least if my house I would  remove a couple inches of dirt, tamp the are down apply a few inches of gravel tamp it in really good and set some pier blocks, add posts and beam. If beam is too spendy, triple up a few two by sixes( granted not same strength but willl more than suffice for this application)  pressure treated if you are using wood that will be on ground and subject to moisture but green fir for posts and beam  I know a lot of guys use the adjustable supports but I simply jack the floor up an extra inch and set everything in place and remove jack  Manny if you need a hand give me a holla!!

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You ABSOLUTELY do NOT have to reinforce those floor joists.   Total and complete waste of time and money.  

You have basically no span when the load is so close to the main beams.   That, plus your load is perpendicular to your joists.   The span limit for 2x8 beams on 16"OC and 60lb/sqft live load is 11'.  You have like 2'. 

You CAN do anything you want, just know that it is not necessary at all. 

 

 

Edited by pdxmonkeyboy
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