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NoDoze


NoDoze
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Hello! I've been a reefer for over 15 years, currently only have a 120gal, located in North Bend, WA. My prized possession is an 18" Riterri I've had for 5 years. My previous one didn't survive the move up here from SF, which was also 18" and 8 years old. Both of which I considered "rescued" started at about 5" and on the brink of death from the LFS. I've recently dealt with the death of 3 fish (kids named them): A blue hippo tang (Dory) @ 7yrs old, a magnificent foxface (Robo Fishy) @ 5yrs old, and a salfin tang (Sally) @ 5yrs old. Was looking for the PSAS for comfort and found you guys! I look forward to the discussions!

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Welcome NoDoze, we are neighbors... well sort of.  I am in Renton.  I am recently back to the hobby after a long hiatus  Sorry for the loss of the fish, I would love to see pics of the tank and the Riterri for sure.  This group is really active in the Portland area, but in a recent thread we have talked about what to do to get more active up here in the Seattle area.

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I have housed every type of anemone available over the years. When I first started I actually had a tank with a rose bubble tip, rainbow bubble tip, long tentacle, ritteri, carpet, and sebae all together because I loved anemones so much. But they started eating my fish, growing and splitting, so I started giving them away online and to LFS. I now just stick with the Ritteri because I find it the most challenging, the others are "boring". The carpet being the easiest and most aggressive at catching fish. And when I find an anemone at a local fish store in dire need of TLC, I am more than happy to take it because I am FULLY 100% confident I can recoup it, if it "looks" right. LOL Sometimes it may be too late or too far gone to make a recovery.

Tips on rescuing an anemone? Yes...

  1. Have ALOT of patience. Depending on conditions, of the anemone, water, and type of anemone, recovery can take a REALLY long time, months easily.
  2. Make sure there is A LOT of proper lighting. If the anemone is not doing well, it may go into hiding to recoup, but as long as its foot is sticking, it's surviving. It will come out of hiding or reach for lighting when needed. During the recoup process it ONLY needs light. The tentacles and mouth will tell you when it's ready to eat. For example, I have seen a 6" anemone shrink to 2" and go into the back of the tank for almost a month before moving back into the light and making a full recovery.
  3. Make sure your water parameters are 100% good, especially during the recoup period. When in excellent health the anemone can take changes in water parameters with no changes in visual or behavior. But in a weaker state it will react immediately.
  4. The anemone will reflect the conditions it's living in, so "read" the anemone. The texture and behavior of the tentacles, oral disc and mouth directly reflect the "health" of the anemone.
  5. Don't poke, probe, or try to move the anemone when it is recouping. If the lighting is good, water parameters are good, it's up to the anemone to recover, and it will if it is strong enough. Anemones naturally get damaged in the wild, so they can recover on their own.

The wifie calls me the anemone whisperer...so go figure...LOL

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