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reefnjunkie
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This has some good info on spectrum for those who DIY LED.

 

I plan to incorporate some green, blue, and red to my builds-

Of course they did not have this information or colors when I built mine-DOH!

 

I think the real trick is how you go about placing these so you can properly mix the differing LEDs as to create a non-spotlighted effect. I would be very careful on how many red you add...

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I think the real trick is how you go about placing these so you can properly mix the differing LEDs as to create a non-spotlighted effect. I would be very careful on how many red you add...

The few I add I will run without optics which if i am not mistaken is about 120 degree spread-I'm only adding a few reds, and from everything I have read, its mainly for my viewing pleasure-DOH!

 

I have always worried about adding the greens and reds to my lighting. That it might encourage the growth of algea in my system.

Very justifiable concern-I will be adding 4 greens, 2 maybe 3 reds, and 4 blues to a 60 bulb fixture-the new LEDs will most likely be replacing most of what is presently Royal Blue

Its on my list to do but I may not have time until next month and when I do have time, I'm only doing it on 1 of the fixtures (my frag tank) to see how it plays out

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On my custom led (made for actinic replacement) I went with all 3w cree leds on 18" long heat sinks (two units). Each unit has these leds: 4 royal blues, 4 UV violet, 2 red, and 2 green. So far the colors have all blended nicely. The reds are very bright and you can see a faint red shimmer on the back of the tank wall. Other then that its done a great job bringing out more coral colors. I also am still running my two 250w 20k radiums

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I have read a few articles on how the red spectrum destroys zooxanthellae, espically with LED's. I will attempt to find them and post here too.

 

There is a growing number of people using a red t-5 lamp, in conjunction with many blue t-5's to create a limited destruction of zooxanthellae within corals to get the "zeo pastel look" out of corals.

 

I guess it comes down to what Look/goals you are after.

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The way I see it is it is mostly about personal preferance and tolerance then anything else because I have seen many tanks with many diffrent lights and color temprature that are doing quite well. If your corals are happy and growing then go with the color that you like the best if theat color promotes algea growth but you still love it then get to scrubin. Some like more blue and some like it more white. Some want to have the red stand out. I like it a little on the blue side but not to much.You could grow corals under 6500k lights but they would not look very colorful. I will stick to a nice even blend of blue and whites and keep around a 20k look to my tank because that makes me happy, and reefin is about making people happy =)

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Thats an interesting read-The reason I am considering Red (again maybe 2-3 LEDs on a fixture of 60 LEDs) is to capture the spectrum in that nm range. I know the Radions have 4 Reds on the fixture they make that has a total of 34 LEDs (if I'm not mistaken) so adding 2-3 without optics would give some spectrum in that nm range and hopefully no optics will keep the intensity to a minimum.

 

 

I could see having to many Reds would produce similar results that were noted in that article-time will tell since I'm still leaning towards adding a couple, we will see how it goes.

 

 

I have had pretty good results with just the Royal Blue and Cool White but after reading the first article I posted I see am missing some spectrums that the Blue, Green and Red produce.

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I went with the tri-color par38 bulb because it included 2 red led's. I don't have any algae in my tank and my glass doesn't get dirty quick. The bulb has twelve led's and 2 are red. The color the bulb puts out is not super blue, which I don't mind.

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very interesting, and I plan to read it today.

 

green should be interesting and something I've wanted to do, possibly on an independent driver (moonlight?) so I can adjust it how I want.

 

green shouldn't do anything for algae...at least not for the algae's that look green. the reason they look green is because the chlorophyll can't use those frequencies of light, so it gets reflected. the reds/oranges are the most productive frequencies for chlorophyll, so I'd be much more concerned about the reds than greens. All that to say that in an SPS tank with minimal nutrients, algae won't grow with even the most chlorophyll-friendly spectrum...

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