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fiberglass tank


stylaster
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After talking to a friend late last night.... he planted the idea in my head to do a peninsula style fiberglass tank.

So.... here is the layout idea.

I have a room that connects to my garage. Take the wall facing the garage and cut out a 60" wide by 24" tall hole for the front viewing pane made out of star fire glass

Now go out into the garage and extend the tank to 8' long made out of cinder blocks for stand, plywood and 4 x 4 wood framing coated in fiberglass.

This will make the tank look like your looking down a long gorge when viewed from the 'fish room' The tank will come out to about 600 gallons.

What do you guys think? Anyone work with fiberglass and how this would be done?

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Roy,

If I were to do a fglass tank I would call a fglass shop and ask how much it would be to shoot it with a chopper gun and lay on a layer of cloth on top of 6 oz (inside). Hand lamintion would also work. When you check out a shop take a look at the edge of the parts they have produced. A uniform edge thickness is the mark of a good job along with a fairly smooth surface and not many air bubbles. Fglass bonds really well to wood. If you incorporate small wood strips and then laminate over the strips it adds a lot of structural integrity. Tell them what you are looking for and get a quote.

 

I have made surfboards, boats, furniture, motorcylce parts, truck parts out of fglass and I would think twice about about doing it in my garage. It means laying down tarpaper, visqueen and making sure you have proper ventilation. If you do a too dry or wet lamination you are pretty well scr**ed. Plus if your catalyst "kicks" too soon you end up with a big pile of junk.

 

I have no idea about how to seal glass to fglass.

 

The last time I bought resin it was $1.00 a gallon for top quality Dow laminating resin. We bought 1,000 gallons.

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I thought Charles might have built a fiberglass tank. Shoot him a message. Tap plastic might be s good local resource also.

 

Stay away from TAP. They are overpriced have inferior products and don't know how to fglass.

If you want to cast bugs in resin for keychains they are great!

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Yeah, I've build several back in my freshwater days. The price of resin I'm sue had gone up some since I last used it. HD or Loews carry the resin or if you know someone in the business of selling automotive paint that would be the way to go.

 

Basically you build your "box" then put a strip down in the corners and for smaller tanks just pour in a 1/4" thick coat and just let dry. The biggest was a 220gal 76" x 24" 24". The window part was just a frame with a hole in it and a piece of glass about 1/2" less the size of the tank (not the window) and use silicone, add the glass and add weights. You don't need to line the tank with cloth for smaller tanks, but one layer of woven and 1/4" thick layer of resin and of course a thick enough box will work for a large tank.

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Yeah, I've build several back in my freshwater days. The price of resin I'm sue had gone up some since I last used it. HD or Loews carry the resin or if you know someone in the business of selling automotive paint that would be the way to go.

 

Basically you build your "box" then put a strip down in the corners and for smaller tanks just pour in a 1/4" thick coat and just let dry. The biggest was a 220gal 76" x 24" 24". The window part was just a frame with a hole in it and a piece of glass about 1/2" less the size of the tank (not the window) and use silicone, add the glass and add weights. You don't need to line the tank with cloth for smaller tanks, but one layer of woven and 1/4" thick layer of resin and of course a thick enough box will work for a large tank.

 

 

 

 

I would never pour 1/4" of resin and assume it is a stable. Eventually, the 1/4" is going to craze and crack and water will seep into the plywood. Even more so with "finishing resin".It might be 3 months or 5 years or a quick stress. For anything about the size you are talking about you need mat, roving, or cloth. Any slight flex is going to crack 1/4" of un-reinforced resin once it has aged.

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I would never pour 1/4" of resin and assume it is a stable. Eventually' date=' the 1/4" is going to craze and crack and water will seep into the plywood. Even more so with "finishing resin".It might be 3 months or 5 years or a quick stress. For anything about the size you are talking about you need mat, roving, or cloth. Any slight flex is going to crack 1/4" of un-reinforced resin once it has aged.[/quote']

 

That's why you need a good solid "box" and for his size at least 1" marine ply, doubles. I'd still just pour in a 1/4" thick layer of resin, the box is to hold the water, the resin is to water proof it only, and still just use cloth in the corners. You might not think so, but have you ever built a plywood tank?

 

I'm sorry surfboards and fish tanks are totally different, apples and mangoes.

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That's why you need a good solid "box" and for his size at least 1" marine ply, doubles. I'd still just pour in a 1/4" thick layer of resin, the box is to hold the water, the resin is to water proof it only, and still just use cloth in the corners. You might not think so, but have you ever built a plywood tank?

 

I'm sorry surfboards and fish tanks are totally different, apples and mangoes.

 

 

That is 5 years experience in commercial fiberglass fabrication. That is 8-10 hours a day, Charles for 5 years making parts from the size of a finger to 16 ft.

 

1/4" depth of poured resin is not sound glassing technique. Never has been and never will be. You could get by with 1/16". Anything more is going to crack, The only question is when? Why not add the integrity of cloth?

 

It is like comparing fiberglass and acrylic.

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I want to take this opportunity to apologize to Charles for the tone and context of my comments. I was too judgmental in my approach to this and for that I am sorry.

 

After all, we are a community that prides itself on civility and assistance to each other.

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