Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tidalsculpin

Mudskipper Tank @ Eugene Middle School

Recommended Posts

Well, I finally did it. Mudskippers are on their way.

 

The students have been planning the change for 3 weeks. Thursday we did major renovation of the rbta tank to convert.

 

Step one. Consolidate live rock and rbtas from the 40 to the 80 reef.

Step two. Start a 10 gallon temp tank for the remaining rock and algae for live feeds. Change out hardware (slower return) and drain and cap the closed loop. Drill the plex overflow at 7 inches! Rainguard the holes and gaps.

Step three: Mudscape! Lots of old sand, and a lot of grey tidal seachem sand I had from the coldwater build.

Step four: Decide what live rock would make good perches. Rockscpe.

Step five: Cycle the tank.

Step six: Order mangroves and plant.

Step seven: Order the skips from Frank's Aquarium in NYC.

Step 8: Acclimate the buggers. IE Drop on the sand island.

 

 

 

The purpose of this tank is to diversify the environments kids get exposed to. Mangrove forests and their creatures are vital to reef health in many parts of the world. This shows a piece of habitat that is absolutely as fascinating as an sps forereef.

 

Check it out the class build.

 

Skips come Tuesday I think. Their were shipping issues last week so I was hesitant to post yet. But here we go !

post-198-141867775785_thumb.jpg

post-198-141867775788_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice project Joel.(rock2) I can tell you have done some research. Keep us updated! How many mudskippers did you order?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Their are 6 on the way.

Periopthalmus novemradiatus An Indian/ Malaysian Skipper.

 

They get to be 2.5 inches. They are territorial but will not kill or maim like the African species. Very nice behaviors to watch.

 

These fish can in live in full marine salinity. Currently The tank is a 1.15. That is their aquacultured parameter. I will slowly raise salinity with the kids as an experiment. The idea is to recycle the reef/ coldwater in this tank.

 

Any tips on mangrove survival?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience with Red Mangroves (Rhizophora mangle), they do best in full light, but leaves can dry under heat of MH lamps. Be sure to rinse salt from leaves. A spray bottle of RO water works well for this. Mangroves pull nutrients from the water. Be sure to add magnesium as needed.

 

MANGROVES IN REEF AQUARIA by DANIEL KNOP

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/apr2002/feature.htm

 

Magnificent Mangroves b Julian Sprung

http://www.twolittlefishies.com/images/mangrove_manual.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I currently still have a single 250 light above the tank. I think a switch to 24" t5s is imminent. In the meantime, I have the light off. I will start a cheesy 10 gallon makeshift hood setup on Monday for the mangroves. They are currently immersed in the water in the display.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are sme new pics for a Sunday afternoon. I went to "work."

Got a new light. It is a coralife 30 inch strip with two no t5s. Colormax and 10,000K.

Makes me feel like I am in freshwater again. I think it looks awesome.

Settled in the mangroves too.

 

picture.php?albumid=65&pictureid=318

picture.php?albumid=65&pictureid=317

picture.php?albumid=65&pictureid=319

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gee if I kept track of my Sunday work days. Cool looking set up Joel. What are your summer plans for the tanks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fish came! I'll post pics tomorrow.All six fish were floating on little pieces of styro in 20 mls of water. It was really cute. Mangroves are going dormant a bit. Keeping watch. These fish are unbelievably cool. And, I have a bit of aiptasia surviving in the tank to boot. :)

As far as summer is concerned, I have a job in the building for the month of July. I would love some Eugene volunteers to help me out one day a week so I don't have to go in every day in August.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool, cant wait to see pics of the fish. i was also thinking it would look cool if you had some of the mangroves in front of the rock. that way the fish can swim and hide around their stocks, and you can see the fish. otherwise you may get them all hiding in the back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Sorry it has been a while. Busy week. The tank is settling in nicely. I have had some of the mangroves go dormant and lose their eaves. Others are taking to the environment nicely. The hood is super tight and this makes the glass lok like a rainforest in there. I think this is good for the mangrove. The condensation cleans the leaves.

My refugium is bursting at the seams. Great growth. I started a reverse light cycle two weeks ago. This has been good for the caluerpa and chaeto below. Amphipods have been spottted burrowing in the sand. The skippers have started to burrow near the "shore." There are no visible holes but they pop out from the surface as if bbbing up and down. All six are still alive. Two have escaped through my overflow. The skippers are pretty small. They look like immature watchman gobies/young lawnmower blennies on land. Cute guys.

 

Basking on the beach.

http://s92.photobucket.com/albums/l37/tidalsculpin/?action=view&current=05082009045.flv

 

Hunting reef snails!

 

http://s92.photobucket.com/albums/l37/tidalsculpin/?action=view&current=05082009044.flv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the overflow a bulkhead fitting? If it is, it's easy enough to get a screen for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I fixed it today. I drilled to fit with a bulkhead fitting, but added a finer screen like rain guard. Originally, I used rain guard, but two buggers escaped into the overflow. They were very easy to get back. I put them back and glued on a finer rainguard type mesh I was given by Eric Hanneman at Liquid Sunshine. I superglued it in place and put a poly filter behind it. 180 Bob helped me. He also delivered 4 tanks to us today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually' date=' I fixed it today. I drilled to fit with a bulkhead fitting, but added a finer screen like rain guard. Originally, I used rain guard, but two buggers escaped into the overflow. They were very easy to get back. I put them back and glued on a finer rainguard type mesh I was given by Eric Hanneman at Liquid Sunshine. I superglued it in place and put a poly filter behind it. 180 Bob helped me. He also delivered 4 tanks to us today.[/quote']

 

Glad it all worked out! I meant to ask you awhile ago about your overflows, and how they were screened. I have been shipped mudskippers that were less than 1" in length!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel's mudskipper tank is super awesome!!!! I think every school in America should have a mudskipper tank in their classroom. What a fantastic way to teach the youth!!!! Or anyone for that matter!!!!

Field Trip to Joel's Classroom (rock2)

 

Will post some pictures

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mudskipper Pictures

 

Joel:

 

Thanks for having us down Friday afternoon. It was great fun to see your coldwater tank again and especially the mudskipper tank. The world could use many more teachers with your dedication and enthusiasm.

 

Here are some pictures of Joel's Skippers.

 

 

MudskipperTank.jpg?t=1242578766

 

mudskipper2.jpg?t=1242578884

 

00101.jpg?t=1242578978

 

00103.jpg?t=1242579038

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those are awesome!!! so are these fish or amphibeans?

 

and off topic, what are you eating and washing down with mt dew at the assembly? is that a gold fish? i think that would be against PNWMAS policy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I ate six worms. Annelids only!

 

The mudskipper is a member of the goby famly. They are not amphibians!

They are true fish with an impressive evolutionary adaptation. They don't have lungs. They have gills that are adapted to exchange oxygen through their gills by trapping water in them. So their gills act as water bags carrying their oxygen supply with them. They also exchange oxygen through their skin. They do not have feet. They have fins adapted for "skipping".

 

 

This is the most extensive website I have found on these fish. If you like reading aboutevolution it is right up your alley. These fish are an incredible teaching tool for biology.

 

http://www.themudskipper.org/index.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×