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SuncrestReef

Kole Tang with HLLE - Lesson learned

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Two weeks ago I set up my first quarantine tank.  Up until then, I had just added fish and corals directly into my display tank since it was brand new and I had little to lose if something went wrong.  But I wanted to add a Kole Tang to help tackle my macro algae problems, so I figured I would go the QT route now that my tank is more established.

I picked up a nice Kole Tang, but within the first couple days I noticed large white bumps forming on its head and sides.  

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I wasn't sure what it was and suspected possibly ich or lymphocystis.  I started treating with PraziPro and within a couple days the white bumps were gone but it left behind scar tissue.  Closer examination revealed missing flesh or divots.  I finally figured out this was likely HLLE.

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As I researched HLLE, I learned that it can be caused by activated carbon.  I didn't realize that the Tetra hang-on-back filter pump I placed on my quarantine tank used activated carbon in their filters.  Tetra calls it "Stay Clean Technology", but nowhere in their documentation does it describe this is actually activated carbon inside the filter pads.  Instead I learned this from 3rd party reviews.

I removed the carbon filter cartridge and replaced it with clean filter pads.  Hopefully the HLLE won't progress any more, but the damage is done.  I'm just kicking myself for not more carefully researching this Tetra filter before putting it into use.  Lesson learned. 😞

Edited by SuncrestReef
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Sorry to hear you and the Tang are having to deal with this.  As you probably have researched, HLLE is often multifactorial.  Stressors such as overcrowding, poor water quality, or poor nutrition may predispose fish to HLLE. The exact etiology of this syndrome is unknown. Proposed causative agents include hexamitid parasites, activated carbon/carbon dust, heavy metals such as copper, stray electrical voltage, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) radiation products, nutrient deficiencies of vitamins A and/or C and minerals, and various other stressors.  It can be treated, although it requires good water quality, varied nutrition and use of a topical medication:  0.01% becaplermin (Regranex®, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical Inc., Raritan, NJ).  This is an expensive medication and it requires anesthesia to the specimen being treated. 

I think we all have been in this vote sometime during our “quest to have a piece of the ocean.”

 

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10 hours ago, PetVet said:

Sorry to hear you and the Tang are having to deal with this.  As you probably have researched, HLLE is often multifactorial.  Stressors such as overcrowding, poor water quality, or poor nutrition may predispose fish to HLLE. The exact etiology of this syndrome is unknown. Proposed causative agents include hexamitid parasites, activated carbon/carbon dust, heavy metals such as copper, stray electrical voltage, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) radiation products, nutrient deficiencies of vitamins A and/or C and minerals, and various other stressors.  It can be treated, although it requires good water quality, varied nutrition and use of a topical medication:  0.01% becaplermin (Regranex®, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical Inc., Raritan, NJ).  This is an expensive medication and it requires anesthesia to the specimen being treated. 

I think we all have been in this vote sometime during our “quest to have a piece of the ocean.”

 

Best concise yet comprehensive description of HLLE that I've seen yet. Get this animal plenty of nori , algae wafers and fresh greens, such as bok choy, mustard greens, romaine, etc. This will result in a lot more waste and you'll have to step up cleaning but you may start to see an improvement in a couple weeks. If you do, keep up with the "green" feeding. Good luck and keep us posted!

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That’s because of an awesome mentor your associated with (Tim).   I just wish he was a part of my veterinary education back then. I do happen to pick up notes from here and there.  

Sounds like a future topic for a meeting:  aquatic marine diseases and current treatments.   

Scott

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I had two of my tangs come down with this after my QT "went black" with carbon dust... like literally black.

They are healing up though, I have been feeding nori, selcon soaked food (although most fish avoid the selcon smell), dosing vitamin C, kent marine zoecon, and also beta glucan.

beta glucan is awesome stuff and I think everyone should be treating new fish with it. It is strange to me that things with questionable efficacy hold on on the hobby (garlic) and stuff that has been peer reviewed and shown to have great results is unknown.


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51 minutes ago, pdxmonkeyboy said:

I had two of my tangs come down with this after my QT "went black" with carbon dust... like literally black.

beta glucan is awesome stuff and I think everyone should be treating new fish with it. It is strange to me that things with questionable efficacy hold on on the hobby (garlic) and stuff that has been peer reviewed and shown to have great results is unknown.


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But it works on vampires so it must be good right?

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