Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
nyciachef

Help

Recommended Posts

I believe my powder brown has ick, he has white spots on his body and fins and spends a lot of time swimming in front of a power head, now the traditional remedy is a copper medication. Unfortunately for me is this is a full tank and I don’t have a quarantine, does any one have any experience with garlic treatments or any ideas on what else I could do. He is a beautiful fish and I don’t want to lose him.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe my powder brown has ick, he has white spots on his body and fins and spends a lot of time swimming in front of a power head, now the traditional remedy is a copper medication. Unfortunately for me is this is a full tank and I don’t have a quarantine, does any one have any experience with garlic treatments or any ideas on what else I could do. He is a beautiful fish and I don’t want to lose him.
 
 
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


bbde44c4f1fe98e9e7d17e3928e4ac3b.jpg



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have the space, the best option would be to remove that animal and put it in a quarantine tank. Then treat with an over-the-counter medication at the recommended dosage. In addition to treating the tank, you'll also want to gravel-vac the bottom of the tank aggressively, at least 2x/day to interrupt the life cycle, along with water changes. In the meantime, get that animal lots of greens like nori and algae-based foods.

Here's a good diagram of the life cycle of this protozoan: http://www.rk2.com/uv-information.php

Treat from within with appropriate foods. Treat from without with medication and aggressive husbandry. Good luck, chef!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you have the space, the best option would be to remove that animal and put it in a quarantine tank. Then treat with an over-the-counter medication at the recommended dosage. In addition to treating the tank, you'll also want to gravel-vac the bottom of the tank aggressively, at least 2x/day to interrupt the life cycle, along with water changes. In the meantime, get that animal lots of greens like nori and algae-based foods.
Here's a good diagram of the life cycle of this protozoan: http://www.rk2.com/uv-information.php
Treat from within with appropriate foods. Treat from without with medication and aggressive husbandry. Good luck, chef!
 

Thank you for this, I have him in qt, it’s a small tank but he is looking better, I’ll keep him in there for about a week or so just to make sure he is healthy and then return him to the main tank. Or do you think I should keep him in longer?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, nyciachef said:


Thank you for this, I have him in qt, it’s a small tank but he is looking better, I’ll keep him in there for about a week or so just to make sure he is healthy and then return him to the main tank. Or do you think I should keep him in longer?

 

Blue's right. I would quarantine this animal at least 4 weeks to ensure that, if it is Cryptocaryon irritans, you have interrupted the life cycle. That's key. Longer is even more advisable. Siphoning targets the tomont life stage, where they are on the bottom of the tank dividing into hundreds of theronts. They then hatch into the free-swimming larval stage, where the medication can affect them. Copper and other Txs really can't do much about the 1st stage, trophonts, and the second stage, the tomonts. It's a pain to deal with but very rewarding if you can save the fish through aggressive husbandry. Multiple water changes each day also help you stay ahead of NH3 on what may be an uncycled quarantine tank.

 

My students made a siphoning tool out of the brush attachment of a vacuum cleaner snugged onto 1" PVC pipe with a hose attached. This works great for brushing and hoovering up the tomonts and makes siphoning 2-4 times a day less of a chore and much more effective. Just remember to sanitize and clean that thing well between siphon sessions. Again, good luck chef!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×