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Chindo

Hey guys

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Im using a marineland 200 filter.. it hangs off the back... I will set up my phone and snap some picture tomorrow... im currently. In the process of finding a sump... is a protien skimmed enough filter or should I put something else in the sump? I know the more live rock the better so I was planning on having some in the sump as well.....

would I need to put a light over my sump since im planning on using live rock in it

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You want to figure on having 1-2lbs of rock per gallon of water, the more rock you have, the better off you'll be. A skimmer isn't for filtration really, not in the way you're thinking, it's to help the natural filtration your rock provides. I run skimmerless, feed daily, and have no problems, and I run a pretty heavy bioload, that's only going to get bigger lol. But, I'm running almost 80lbs of rock in a roughly 70g system currenntly, fixing to add another 50 or so gallons of water to the system, and planning on adding another 100lbs or so of rock.

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Im using a marineland 200 filter.. it hangs off the back... I will set up my phone and snap some picture tomorrow... im currently. In the process of finding a sump... is a protien skimmed enough filter or should I put something else in the sump? I know the more live rock the better so I was planning on having some in the sump as well.....

would I need to put a light over my sump since im planning on using live rock in it

 

It's a good idea to put some live rock in the sump. Many of us also put some macro algea in there also (cheato, caulerpra, etc.). It will need some type of light but not the same as the corals need. I run 5800k daylight cf spiral bulbs over mine. ($12 or so for 3 or 4 at Lowe's) I run my sump lights at night more or less opposite of the display lights which also helps keep the PH steady. (PH drops some in the dark) The live rock and macro algae is what actually provides the filtration biologically. The skimmer just eases the load by filtering out some of the extra protiens. The sump simply provides additional volume to allow more to be used and gives you a place to put the skimmer. It also adds to the volume of water in the system which will also help keep it stable. A well balanced system will require emptying the skimmer cup once a week or two, top offs with freshwater every couple of days (or if you use an auto top off then filling it about once a week), and finally occasional water changes (the frequency is usually dictated by how efficient the biological filter is). Oh, you will also need to feed the tank every few days.

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[ATTACH]10959[/ATTACH] here is my current setup

 

[ATTACH]10960[/ATTACH]

This is the filter..its got that biowheel thing do you guys think it good enough

 

Thanks

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post-8113-141867758971_thumb.jpg

post-8113-141867758973_thumb.jpg

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Got some new items today...

 

Got 15lbs of live rock, snails, hermit crabs and a decorator crab.

[ATTACH]10963[/ATTACH]

 

What do you guys think

 

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post-8113-141867758975_thumb.jpg

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The tank probably isn't ready to support the inverts yet. Should have waited until you were on the downhill side of the initial cycle after the algae bloom to start adding them.

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Ya Ive heard I should have waited and then i have heard i should put some in to start the cycle... and being that im a NOOB i went with the later.... so far everything seems ok. there is some coral.. not sure what as im new and don't know the difference between LPS, SPS and softies... but i put in a 50/50 bulb today and they opened up and look better, they were getting all shriveled up. I stopped by Upscales and picked up a few Clownfish.. I know i maybe should have waited a bit but the guy there said it should be ok. so my 4yr daughter was happy on the way home.

 

Ill put up pictures in the Morning for you guys

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So this tank was setup on the 17th? You probably don't want to buy anything else for this tank for a few weeks. I've only been in this hobby for alittle over a year and I rushed my first tank, ended up starting over. I recently upgraded to a bigger tank and this time I let the full cycle happen and then added stuff slowly and it went a million times better. Just a thought. Also welcome to the forums!

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Ya this is the last of what im putting in the tank. I originally wasn't going to put all this in but excitement got the best of me and then my girls didn't help. I've been watching my ph and nitrate levels along with salinity gonna take a water sample in next week. Thanks again I love this site and its got lots of info

 

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Inverts will not have much impact on the cycle unless they die from starvation. Inverts survive by being tank cleaners and therefore really need to have some algae and or detritus to clean up. Because of this they should only be added at the end of the cycle and in small quantities. Your tank will have a lot to clean towards the end of the initial cycle but that will clear up and having too many inverts will make them starve. Regarding adding the clowns there are still many people that suggest a couple of damsels (which is what clowns are) to cycle the tank. It is however frowned upon by many because there will be a big ammonia spike which can literally burn the fins off them.

 

If you want this hobby to be successful you really need to slow wayyyyy down. Don't add anything else now. (You might have too much already) It takes several weeks/months to set up a successful saltwater system. If you go too fast then all you will be doing is setting yourself up for failure. It will take a minimum of two weeks to get through the initial cycle however it is more likely that you will think the cycle is done then and the standard LFS answer when you ask is that "it will probably be okay". If they give this answer then ask what guarantee they have on the fish. Look for LFS that will provide a 2 week guarantee because they will have a greater interest in your success and will be less likely to rush you into a bad purchase. (Most fish will survive at least 2 or 3 days so keep that in mind when asking about guarantees) In reality most tanks take 4 to 6 weeks to cycle and 8 weeks is not unusual (2 weeks is). I tell people to wait for the ammonia and nitrite to spike, then watch them until they drop to zero. After they reach zero keep an eye on them for two weeks before adding anything to be sure it really is cycled. Then add one fish at a time (or pairs depending on what they are) every two weeks. The two weeks is to allow the tank to cycle again to match the new bio load from adding the fish. (I.E. The tank needs to slowly adjust to support each new addition) Doing this will keep the new cycles to a minimum. If you add too many at a time then you will get a heavy cycle that can cause the tank to spiral out of control.

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This is why I like this forum. Thanks Rick it makes sense the way you have said it. While I wasn't planning on adding anything anymore, a good thing I now realize I have rushed into it a little quick. Will keep you guys updated with everything that is going on.

 

Thanks again

 

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