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steveweast

new tank pic

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[language filter] those RBTAs have went crazy since the last time I saw them Steve. Tank looks as beautiful as ever Steve. Nice work. Later Ryan

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I’m jealous, let’s have the specks, all of them. Very nice setup. Would like to see it in person some day. You should be proud. (clap)

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Man steve, I just drool everytime I see any pics of your tank. *Thumbs up*

 

It's kinda funny, I have one of your tank pics from your website set as the background on my computer. :p

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Steve, WOW absolutely beautiful!!!! The tank looks amazing! Can't believe how much different it looks since I've seen it last. The RBTA's have doubled/tripled in size and it looks like everything else has doubled as well. (wipes off keyboard) As always it looks excellent and thanks for sharing.

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Love the open look you got going on. Still need to see this tank in person someday. How about some updated pics of your cold water tanks when you get time.

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There are still quite a few rics in there....but... worm #2 a few months back really reduced their population. It was their overnight disappearance that clued me into their being a second worm....albeit smaller (only 5 feet long)..... on the prowl again. There really aren't any nice rics on the market these days like there used to be to replace their population.....oh well.

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There's really nothing new with cold tanks.....I REALLY need to go diving though. I have found that many of the colonizing anemones are VERY sensitive to nitrate. Since these cold water systems act more like a fish only system (high bioload with heavy feedings), nitates tend to build over time. The Puget Sound rock is too dense for denitrification. I noticed ill effects when NO3 gets above 15ppm. I'm now using a sulfer denitrator to keep the tanks' NO3 at near zero.....it was the only way.

 

Oh...this guy is kind of new....I got him a few months ago....

 

 

 

ornatebox.jpg

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It's the anemones that require the feedings.....fish actually need less compared with the warm water fish because of the slower metabolism and activity. The anemones get their needs provided solely through feedings since none are photosynthetic. When I feed the anemones (twice a week).....I feed a fist size ball of scallops....with a total system volume of about 150 gals. If I fail to feed the anemones, they start shrinking fast.

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I REALLY need to go diving though.

 

Lets go and break in that new truck Steve. I take off on my trip this Sunday and will be back for the weds before Thanksgiving, lets go hit the sound over the long weekend!!

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Is the diving very good around here? I tried to get certified for my Fiji Honeymoon, but found I had sinus disease and couldn't get Dr.'s clearance. (glad I found out before going and not certified there, probably would have blown my brains out on the first dive as I was blocked 90% on right and 60% on left) Thank God I didn't lie on the questionaire about sinus infections! The thought had crossed my mind for how badly I wanted it. Had surgery 2 years ago and now have a Dr.'s note for permission for instruction now that I'm cured! I just haven't done it yet since not going anywhere extravagant. Would it be worth doing now just for Peugeot Sound? What is there we can actually see in the NW?

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The diving up here is freaking awesome, better than diving in most of the tropics, I would admit. Oregon has great dive sites too, so its not just all pudget, but thats worth it... you see tons here seals, octopi, small soft corals (anemone like), amenones, sea pens, fishies, eels, crabs. Just tons of stuff

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The diving up here is freaking awesome' date=' better than diving in most of the tropics, I would admit. Oregon has great dive sites too, so its not just all pudget, but thats worth it... you see tons here seals, octopi, small soft corals (anemone like), amenones, sea pens, fishies, eels, crabs. Just tons of stuff[/quote']

 

 

 

Very true....but Puget Sound has more weather protected areas where winter diving is a bit easier.... especially shore diving. Also, collection sites are more numerous in Wa than Or.

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Very true....but Puget Sound has more weather protected areas where winter diving is a bit easier.... especially shore diving. Also' date=' collection sites are more numerous in Wa than Or.[/quote']

Collect what? I thought we couldn't keep anything, especially in Oregon. I'm assuming anything kept, like starfish and flounders won't survive in our warmer tanks, or am I wrong?. I know when I've been shore fishing with my 12 foot pole, I catch all kinds of small bottom dwellers, but don't know if I could keep any in my tank. When I can afford it, I'll go get certified and hopefully find some folks to dive with.

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